How BPMN Misses the Target

One bright hope for business process modeling, developed between 2003 and 2010, was the standard known as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). This would be the way to model businesses!  But today, most people use a simple flowchart in everyday use.  Why is that?

Just this week I received an email from a professor in Germany with some process models and with the apology: “Sorry, these are not in BPMN or any formal notation.”   Well, they usually aren’t and it is time to start asking they question: why? Continue reading

Models and Organizations Don’t Mix

This another installment in the series pointing out the problems with using a hand-drawn business process model.  The last post was how a business process model fails in the promise to be easier than programming.  Even if you get past that issue, and hire programmers to make the models, a static model is not really suitable for a human organization anyway. Continue reading

Time to Stop Using Business Process Models

Whew!  It has been a few months since my last post in October on my way to the EDOC conference in Stockholm.  Presentations and papers went very well there, and I have been working on an entirely new concept.  It all centers around realizing that having to tie an organization down to a fixed, manually drawn process is the main problem.   Instead, a completely new approach is needed for supporting business processes: Emergent Synthetic Processes.

Continue reading

BPMN vs. professionals, 2.0

Last week brought us a vigorous debate about the role of BPMN, where I took the controversial position that “BPMN 2.0 is no longer for Business Professionals“.  Adam Deane collected quotes from the major contributors.  Sandy Kemsley calls it “The Great BPMN Debate of 2010” and her post is a very fair summary of the debate, but missing one important aspect of it:  what is a typical “business professional” and what do they desire? Continue reading