How BPMN Misses the Target

One bright hope for business process modeling, developed between 2003 and 2010, was the standard known as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). This would be the way to model businesses!  But today, most people use a simple flowchart in everyday use.  Why is that?

Just this week I received an email from a professor in Germany with some process models and with the apology: “Sorry, these are not in BPMN or any formal notation.”   Well, they usually aren’t and it is time to start asking they question: why? Continue reading

Two Languages Divide but don’t Conquer

There is a continual ongoing debate on how best to express how people plan to work together.  Earlier posts make the case that two-dimensional graphical languages are inappropriate for knowledge workers.  Many argued against this saying that these languages are still useful for process specialists.  However, for unpredictable work, the knowledge worker must directly do the process planning.  This post addresses the question of whether we might be able to use two languages in one system: one for the knowledge workers, and one for the business analysts. Continue reading

Steve White on BPMN at BPM2012

Steve White gave a keynote speech at the BPM2012 conference this morning on the history and development of BPMN.  He has been the driving force for BPMN from the beginning, chairing the development committee for many years, and he is still driving this forward today.  He gave an excellent overview of the origins and development of the notations.  My interest picked up when we started to talk about case management Continue reading

BPMN is Incompatible with ACM

What is the role of two-dimensional process graphing for knowledge workers in Adaptive Case Management (ACM)?  It is a given that an ACM system must support some form of process plan.  This post explores how a knowledge worker might specify a process plan, what are the requirements on that means of specifying, and what technical training requirements exist for the workers who specify the processes. Continue reading