Emergent Synthetic Process (ESP) is the Answer

I have written 6 posts explaining why a manually created business process models are simply not agile enough for today’s organizations.  What should we do instead?   Glad you asked.  A different approach I am calling Emergent Synthetic Processes avoids the problems of a hand drawn process model, and still can offer a path to continual improvement. Continue reading

Agreement Itself Holds Companies Back

In the last five posts I outlined five ways that business process models are dificient when it comes to automating work.  In this post I give a sixth, and quite possibly the most significant problem:  Agreement takes effort, and once you have agreement, that agreement becomes a barrier to further change.

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How BPMN Misses the Target

One bright hope for business process modeling, developed between 2003 and 2010, was the standard known as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). This would be the way to model businesses!  But today, most people use a simple flowchart in everyday use.  Why is that?

Just this week I received an email from a professor in Germany with some process models and with the apology: “Sorry, these are not in BPMN or any formal notation.”   Well, they usually aren’t and it is time to start asking they question: why? Continue reading

Models and Organizations Don’t Mix

This another installment in the series pointing out the problems with using a hand-drawn business process model.  The last post was how a business process model fails in the promise to be easier than programming.  Even if you get past that issue, and hire programmers to make the models, a static model is not really suitable for a human organization anyway. Continue reading

RPA / BPM Implementation Strategy

There is a broad misconception that RPA about “business process” by itself. I have heard people say that they were going to switch from BPM to RPA. That is strange because the capabilities are quite different. It makes sense to use RPA and BPM together, and sometimes you can use one without the other, but only to solve different problems. Continue reading