BPMN vs. professionals, 2.0

Last week brought us a vigorous debate about the role of BPMN, where I took the controversial position that “BPMN 2.0 is no longer for Business Professionals“.  Adam Deane collected quotes from the major contributors.  Sandy Kemsley calls it “The Great BPMN Debate of 2010” and her post is a very fair summary of the debate, but missing one important aspect of it:  what is a typical “business professional” and what do they desire? Continue reading

ACM Tweet Jam Summary Part 2 of 3

We held a tweetjam on the subject of Adaptive Case Management (ACM) on July 15.  It is going to take me three posts to get this all in.  See Part 1. This post contains part 2 which contains the bulk of the discussion of how ACM relates to BPM: is it different, and how? Continue reading

ACM Tweet Jam Summary Part 1 of 3

We held a tweetjam on the subject of Adaptive Case Management (ACM) on July 15.  I have been on vacation since then, and only now getting around to writing about it. What a big task!  In two hours 660 posts were made, many of them quite thought provoking.  After eliminating the duplicate RT posts, it still came to over 6000 words.  So it is going to take me three posts to get this all in.  Here is part 1. Continue reading

Where did I put that major airline merger process definition?

Imagine the folks at United Airlines and Continental Airlines last week as they announced the largest airline merger in history.  Ask yourself a some simple questions:

  • Did they use a BPMN diagram to describe the things that need to be done to accomplish the merger?  If not why not? Continue reading

Should We Redefine BPM?

Now that we have determined that BPM is not Dead, discussion has turned in a big way to whether BPM should be redefined.  Steve Towers hosted a very long discussion of this on his BP Group on Linked In, with over a hundred comments.  A lively discussion, all over the map.  Peter Shooff at eBizQ todays asks the question, how would you redefined it. Continue reading

Is BPM Dead?

Scott Francis writes an column saying “BPM is Doing Just Fine, Thankyou” saying that the rumors of BPM’s death are, as Mark Twain would put it: exaggerated.  There has been a lot of  interest and concern on this topic in recent weeks.

Before going too far, let me clearly state that BPM is not dead.  It is vibrant and continues growing. At the same time something else is happening we should all understand. Continue reading